Employing and accommodating workers with psychiatric disabilities

The following topics are addressed: (1) what is meant by a psychiatric disability under the ADA, its severity, and its effect on the employment of the individual; (2) popular misconceptions about people with psychiatric disabilities, including: such disabilities are uncommon; mental illness is the same as mental retardation; likely to be violent; there is no hope of recovery; and people with psychiatric disabilities can't tolerate job stress; (3) legal limitations on determining if a worker has a psychiatric disability; (4) how psychiatric disabilities may affect an individual's work performance; and (5) examples of accommodations for workers with psychiatric disabilities (such as clearly delineated performance expectations and schedules that incorporate flex-time).A listing of 12 sources of additional information is provided. School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell Univ.Mancuso Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse [S.l.] This brief paper summarizes requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 related to employing and accommodating workers with psychiatric disabilities. Y.] : [Program on Employment and Disability, New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University] ; [Washington, DC] : U. of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, Educational Resources Information Center, [1994]Employing and accommodating workers with psychiatric disabilities./Laura L Mancusco; Educational Resources Information Center (U. Y.] : [Program on Employment and Disability, New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University] ; [Washington, DC] : U.

Employing and Accommodating Workers with Psychiatric Disabilities. The following topics are addressed: (1) what is meant by a psychiatric disability under the ADA, its severity, and its effect on the employment of the individual; (2) popular misconceptions about people with psychiatric disabilities, including: such disabilities are uncommon; mental illness is the same as mental retardation; likely to be violent; there is no hope of recovery; and people with psychiatric disabilities can't tolerate job stress; (3) legal limitations on determining if a worker has a psychiatric disability; (4) how psychiatric disabilities may affect an individual's work performance; and (5) examples of accommodations for workers with psychiatric disabilities (such as clearly delineated performance expectations and schedules that incorporate flex-time). A listing of 12 sources of additional information is provided. Cornell University was funded in the early 1990’s by the U. Department of Education National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research as a National Materials Development Project on the employment provisions (Title I) of the ADA (Grant #H133D10155). These updates, and the development of new brochures, have been funded by Cornell’s Program on Employment and Disability, the Pacific Disability and Business Technical Assistance Center, and other supporters.

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