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KTZZ was also the home, for several years, of the eclectic Seattle talk show The Spud Goodman Show.

Producing the weekly interview/music/feature show was an ambitious undertaking for a small station, and the program relied heavily on a large staff of volunteers. As a result, KTZZ began airing CBS shows pre-empted by KIRO-TV (channel 7), along with paid programming and brokered shows.

Originally, to keep people from changing channels, the station broadcast only its station identification—no commercials—between the closing credits of one show and the opening credits of the next show.

One Christmas season, as snow fell in the Puget Sound area, viewers were treated to a gag in which someone pretending to be a janitor (Rob Thielke) takes control of the station for a few moments to deliver "the news" which was mostly a fake weather forecast which began "The weather outside is frightful. As long as I've got no place to go, let it snow, let it snow, let it snow." KTZZ began with a very promising start with fairly strong syndicated shows.

Dudley Communications sold KTZZ, along with sister station WXMI in Grand Rapids, Michigan, to Emmis Communications in 1998; the two stations were then promptly dealt to Tribune Broadcasting in exchange for WQCD in New York City.

Tribune changed the station's call letters to KTWB-TV (The Warner Brothers Network) on April 26, 1999.

As such, KTZZ signed on with a lineup of classic off-network sitcoms, westerns, cartoons, movies, and dramas.

Initially the station was profitable under the ownership of Alden Television, Inc.

With KCPQ now in the kids business, the best cartoons were now airing on KSTW and KCPQ, leaving KTZZ with leftovers (which still was about 5 hours worth of cartoons a day).

KTZZ picked up syndicated cartoons formerly on KSTW in 1995, added more off-network sitcoms and moved away from the brokered format.

As it began airing programming from The WB, KTZZ was helped in part by the fact that KCPQ was moving towards news and more first-run syndicated talk, courtroom, and drama shows.

At the time the station signed on, there was a hole in the Seattle market for cartoons and sitcoms.

While KSTW (channel 11) was running such programming, KCPQ counter-programmed with more adult fare like dramas, game shows, and movies.

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